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Table of contents


  • Indian Spices & Condiments As Natural Healers.
  • Money, Trains, and Guillotines: Art and Revolution in 1960s Japan.
  • Agility and Discipline Made Easy: Practices from OpenUP and RUP by Bruce MacIsaac, Per Kroll.
  • Calculus: Early Transcendental Functions;
  • Agile Software Development at Scale.
  • A Guide to Special Education Advocacy.
  • SAPscript Made Easy;

Since agile software development approaches are being adopted across a wide range of organizations and are now being applied at scale. There are eight factors to consider — team size, geographical distribution, entrenched culture, system complexity, legacy systems, regulatory compliance, organizational distribution, governance and enterprise focus — when scaling agile. Luckily a collection of techniques and strategies exist which scale agile approaches, including considering the full development lifecycle, Agile Model Driven Development AMDD , continuous independent testing, adopting proven strategies, agile database techniques, and lean development governance.

Kaizen: The Japanese Way to Continuous Improvement

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Conference paper. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Download to read the full conference paper text. Ambler, S. Accessed on March 22, , www. Eckstein, J. Kruchten, P. I'm not sure I understand the question.

If I take it literally, it seems to suggest a generalization that I think would be totally unreasonable. I'm also not sure how that question is following from my critique on a specific book. If you'd care to elaborate Andreas Schliep Premium Moderator. I can understand that some might feel uneasy with the disciplinatory side of agile approaches.

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However, I will read a book to build an opinion. There is a sort of trend in both communities to start to listen to each other. I don't feel at unease about discipline. In fact I think being Agile requires a lot of discipline.

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I'm not sure I'm following you. Isn't Agile thinking to a big part about project- and quality management? Might be.

Measuring the Results of your Agile Adoption

I wouldn't be very worried about Agile folks reading the book - they might actually get some good ideas out of it. What I'm worried about is that the main audience of the book will be people who don't yet know much about Agility - and will be mislead by the book on what Agility actually is about. Let's stick with high ceremony: to me it means that there is a detailed plan to follow of who should do what when. I haven't read that book yet.

Agility And Discipline Made Easy : Practices From Openup And Rup

To some degree, though, I think that the knowing comes with the doing. When you start to adapt the process to early, you run the risk of basing your modifications on false assumptions, leading to a mediocre, if not damaging, result. I know a lot of people who have tried the "extreme" testing of XP and would answer "probably more than you currently think". But as the needed process very much depends on the individual forces on your project, only you can decide what is "just enough".

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And I'd suggest that to really decide that effectively, you will need to. It won't teach you a knew way of thinking about software development - a new philisophy, if you will. I'd suggest that that's actually what a big part of Agile Software Development is about.